DECIDER'S BILL OF RIGHTS

You have:

  • - The right to decide something for yourself, even if there is nobody else who thinks you should decide that
  • way.
  • - The right to express your feelings to others in the context of explaining your choice.
  • - The right to say "no" with out feeling guilty.
  • - The right to decide about the use and the way you commit your resources, including your time.
  • - The right to ask others to consider you when they make a choice, or when they question your choice.
  • - The right to not have all the answers.
  • - The right to use emotions in the decisions you make.
  • - The right to share your opinion with the expectation that others will listen.
  • - The right to admit you made a poor decision, to do something about it, and continue to make more
  • decisions.
  • - The right to do what is important to you, including being nice to yourself.

Knowing these rights and freedoms not only helps you take action and stick up for your decision, but it also gives you a sound basis for the assertive behavior you may have to demonstrate in order to get what you want. Assertiveness, as used here, is simply standing up for your own rights without rejecting another person or violating his rights. In knowing your rights, you'll feel more authentic in the pursuit of your goals. You will also be more alert to any attempt to take away those rights.

from LIFE CHOICES by Gordon P. Miller

THE DECISION NOT TO DECIDE IS IN ITSELF A DECISION!

This page created and maintained by Dave Palmer
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